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Monday, August 12, 2013

Homemade Green Tabasco Recipe- Fermented, GAPS Legal

Its interesting how some foods that you never touch growing up become amongst your favorites when you are older. Hot sauce is one of those for me- I remember that I always liked mild salsa with my chips as a kid, because anything hotter would make my mouth feel like it's on fire. But now? Give me heat- the more, the better! Ok, I'll be honest- I still don't enjoy smoke coming out of my ears, but I like adding spice to my food and won't turn down some volcanic salsa now.
Tabasco sauce is something I'd never even heard of until I was nearly an adult, since hot sauce never entered my house. But since I've tried it, I've loved it. Its ingredients are very simple, no crazy ingredients that would scare me off the real deal for health reasons, but maybe for cost reasons? Who knows. I don't go through hot sauce super fast, so I still have the red tabasco sauce I bought a while ago, in addition to my homemade sriracha sauce.
But I got my hands on a bunch of hot green peppers- no, I have no clue what type of peppers they are, all I know is they're really long, about 9-10 inches long, and about an inch and a half in diameter tapering to a point. The exact pepper matters less, since this recipe is a concept recipe more than an exact recipe, since, depending on how hot you like your food, you can change the type of hot pepper you use, and adjust the proportions of the other ingredients.
This recipe differs from standard hot sauce in that it is fermented and therefore full of good for you probiotics.

Homemade Green Tabasco Recipe- Fermented, GAPS Legal

Ingredients:
8 large hot chili peppers
2 teaspoons salt
3/8 cup apple cider vinegar or white vinegar.

Instructions:
1. Cut off the stems, then blend up hot peppers, seeds and all, in the food processor until as smooth as possible.

2. Mix with salt.

3. Put in a jar, and cover with its cover. Don't close too tightly.

4. Leave jar on counter for 48-72 hours, opening it every 24 hours to "burp" it.

5. Mix with vinegar, and let sit for 12 hours.

6. Press through a mesh strainer or a cheesecloth, ensuring that you get out as much liquid as possible. This is your hot sauce.

7. You may want to use the solids as a hot pepper paste as well.

8. Store the sauce in the fridge. Use as you would any hot sauce.

Are you a fan of hot sauce? Do you like things a little spicy or volcanic spicy? What type of hot sauce do you generally use? Do you think you'd try to make this homemade hot sauce?

11 comments:

  1. Could you process and can this?

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    1. I should assume so, especially since it is vinegar based, which makes it safe for water bath canning.

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  2. Did you share your recipe for Sriricha? If so, I missed it. I will try this. I have to see what green hot peppers are available at the market. I love spicy food. I don't know if I would say volcanic, though. At an Indian restaurant a friend ordered a Vindaloo dish. She couldn't eat it. I tried it and I couldn't eat it either. That was the only time I have ever found something too hot but I make sure not to order Vindaloo dishes!

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    1. http://www.pennilessparenting.com/2012/07/homemade-sriracha-sauce-recipe-refined.html Sorry, I had intended to link to it within the post.

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  3. Onions. I'd never eat onions and now I just love them! Great recipe by the way! :)

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  4. 2 questions:
    1: I absolutely can not have vinegar of any kind. Is there a substitute I could use?
    2: I have a bunch of chopped peppers in the freezer, could I use those, and if so, how much?
    -Channah

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    1. Lemon juice also works. Chopped hot peppers from the freezer would probably also work. I cant tell you exact amounts- blend what you have, add a little salt, and then the lemon juice after fermenting.

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  5. I would just use liquid from a prior ferment instead of the vinegar!

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    1. That's a great idea. But for the questioner, who cannot have vinegar of any kind--wouldn't this essentially be a kind of vinegar?

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  6. Just discovered your blog: Thanks! Funny question, but do you wash the peppers first? Unless they are certified organic, I probably wash off the "normal flora" with all of the potential chemicals. Is the fermentation from the normal external flora, or from the pepper itself? Thanks! Judy

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    Replies
    1. I always wash my veggies before fermenting them...

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